7 Things to Know About Interim Care Orders in the UK

7 Things to Know About Interim Care Orders in the UK

An interim care order is a legal order issued in the United Kingdom. To ensure the safety and well-being of a child at risk of harm. This type of order is temporary and can last up to 8 weeks. But it can also be extended, if necessary, by the court. Interim Care Orders in the UK

It is important for those living in the UK to understand the implications of Interim Care Orders in the UK. This is why we have put together this blog post to discuss seven key points.

1) What is an interim care order in the UK?

An interim care order section 31 is a court order that grants the local authority temporary responsibility. For the care and upbringing of a child. It allows the local authority to take the child into their care and make decisions. About their welfare until a full court hearing can take place.

This court order is a powerful tool used by the local authority to protect vulnerable children. And ensure they receive the care and support they need.

ICO usually lasts between 8 and 12 weeks but can be extended if necessary.

Here are some key points to remember about Interim Care Orders in the UK:

  • An interim care order is a court order issued under Section 31 of the Children Act 1989.
  • The local authority can apply for an ICO if they believe a child is at risk of significant harm.
  • It allows the local authority to take temporary responsibility for the care. And upbringing of a child until a full court hearing can occur.

2) Who can apply for an Interim Care Order in the UK?

The local authority can apply for an ICO if they have “reasonable cause” to believe that a child is suffering or likely to suffer significant harm.

Before applying for the order, the local authority must investigate the case and decide. There is sufficient evidence to suggest that an order is necessary. The local authority must also demonstrate that immediate action is required to ensure the child’s safety.

Additionally, other people with parental responsibility (such as a parent or guardian) can apply for an interim care order. If they are concerned about the welfare of a child. And feel that the local authority has not acted quickly enough.

In summary, an ICO can be applied for by:

  • The local authority
  • Any person with parental responsibility for a child
  • A person or organization appointed by the court under Section 33 of the Children Act 1989.

An application for an interim care order can be made under Section 31 of the Children Act 1989.

3) How long does an interim care order last?

An ICO (also known as a section 31 order) is normally valid for eight weeks. And can be renewed or extended by the court if needed. This can happen after the initial application or at any point during the interim period. During this time, the local authority will take responsibility for the child. And their welfare while investigating further and preparing their case for a full hearing.

If an interim care order is not extended, it will automatically expire after 8 weeks.

  • It is important that any extension or renewal of an interim care order is fully justified . And should be clearly documented by the court.
  • Local authorities must monitor and review the child’s welfare throughout this period and make decisions about their best interests.
  • The court must be satisfied that an ICO is necessary. And is in the child’s best interests before it can be granted.

4) What powers do an interim care order give the local authority?

A local authority with an ICO granted under Section 31 of the Children Act 1989 can take certain measures to protect a child. These powers include:

  • Taking the child into care;
  • Deciding who the child should live with;
  • Deciding where the child should live;
  • Deciding which school the child should attend;
  • Requiring other people to provide information about the child’s health, education and welfare;
  • Making arrangements for the child to receive medical or psychological examination or treatment; and
  • Applying for a court order if the local authority believes it is in the child’s best interest.

An interim care order does not give the local authority parental responsibility for the child, but it does allow them to make decisions about the child’s care and upbringing. This means that the local authority has a duty to promote and safeguard the child’s welfare and consider the child’s wishes and feelings in any decisions they make.

Under Section 31 of an ICO, the local authority also has the power to arrange for the child to be placed with someone who is not the child’s parent or carer, such as a foster parent or family member.

The local authority can also make arrangements for the child’s education, including providing extra support.

Finally, the local authority can also make arrangements for contact between the child and their parents or carers if it is deemed to be in the child’s best interests.

5) What duties does an interim care order impose on the local authority?

An interim care order, also known as an “interim accommodation order” under Section 31 of the Children Act 1989, places certain obligations on the local authority.

The local authority must provide accommodation and necessary maintenance for the child and take reasonable steps to ensure the safety and welfare of the child. The local authority must also take all reasonable steps to provide a suitable home for the child, either by finding a family member or other carer, a foster placement, or other accommodation.

Furthermore, the local authority must ensure that the child is regularly visited and that their health, education, and other needs are met.

Specific duties imposed by an ICO include:

  • Making sure the child is receiving the necessary care and support
  • Keeping the child’s parents informed of all decisions relating to the child’s care
  • Appointing a social worker or other professional to act on the child’s behalf
  • Taking all reasonable steps to ensure that any risk posed by the parents is minimized
  • Reporting regularly on the progress of the interim care order at an initial hearing and subsequent reviews.

The court can also impose additional duties on the local authority if necessary.

6) How does an interim care order affect the rights of the child’s parents?

An Interim Care Order Section 31 of the Children Act 1989 allows the local authority to take temporary responsibility for a child while investigations are carried out to decide if further action is necessary.

An ICO restricts the parents’ rights over their child and gives the local authority certain powers regarding their care. For example, an ICO will grant the local authority the power to determine where the child lives, who they see, and how they are educated.

It also places a duty on the parents to cooperate with the local authority and adhere to any decisions or instructions they give. The effect of an ICO on the rights of a child’s parents is, therefore, considerable and can be difficult to navigate.

7) What happens at the end of an interim care order?

At the end of an interim care order, the court will hold a hearing known as a Section 31 hearing. This hearing will review the child’s circumstances and progress since the ICO was granted.

The court will consider all the evidence presented by the local authority, the parents, and any other interested parties, before deciding whether to make a full Care Order or dismiss the application.

If the court decides to make a full Care Order, it may grant additional powers to protect and safeguard the child. If the court decides to dismiss the application, then the local authority will no longer have any legal rights over the child.

At the end of the interim care order, the court will review the evidence and make a decision:

  • Make a full Care Order: If the court makes a full Care Order, they may grant additional powers to protect the child.
  • Dismiss the application: If the court dismisses the application, the local authority will no longer have any legal rights over the child.
  • Section 31 hearing: The court holds a Section 31 hearing at the end of an interim care order to review the circumstances of the child and progress since the order was granted.

FAQs

What is an Interim Care Order (ICO) under Section 31 of the Children Act 1989?

An ICO is a court order made under section 31 of the Children Act 1989 that gives local authorities temporary care and control of a child pending a full care proceedings hearing.

What are the grounds for an ICO to be granted?

When a local authority believes that a child is at risk of significant harm if left in their current situation and cannot reach an agreement with the parents or caretakers, an Interim Care Order (ICO) may be granted. The ICO is necessary to ensure the child’s safety and protection from harm.

What is the duration of an ICO?

An ICO can last up to 8 weeks but can be extended to 7 days, or longer if necessary if the court considers it to be in the child’s best interests.

Can parents appeal an ICO?

Parents can appeal an ICO if they disagree with the court’s decision.

What is the purpose of an ICO?

The purpose of an ICO is to give local authorities temporary care and control of a child, to protect them from harm, and to make arrangements for their welfare while full care proceedings are being held.

What happens after an ICO expires?

After an ICO expires, the local authority will either apply for a full care order, or if the child can be safely returned to their family, the ICO will be discharged, and the child will return home.

Can a child be removed from their home under an ICO?

Yes, a child can be removed from their home under an ICO if it is considered in their best interests and necessary to protect them from harm.

What rights do parents have during an ICO?

Parents have the right to be heard, participate in any court proceedings during an ICO, and receive legal representation if they cannot afford it. They also have the right to see their child and participate in their care and welfare decision-making.

Conclusion

If you’re seeking legal advice on ICO in the UK, it’s important to know the essential things about this process. An ICO protects children in need but can also be a confusing and complex process for those involved. To make the most informed decision for your child’s well-being, understand the 7 key points of Interim Care Orders. Our experienced lawyers at KQ Solicitors are here to help if you need further assistance. Contact us today to ensure your child’s rights and interests are safeguarded. Share this information in your circle if you find it helpful.

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Our Head Solicitor
Khurram Amir Qureshi

Khurram Amir Qureshi has been an advocate of Pakistan since 2004, a Solicitor of England and Wales since 2009, Solicitor of Ireland since 2015. He has extensive experience in family law, Immigration law, Personal injury cases, and Civil and Commercial litigation gaining over 13 years of continuous practice in England and Wales.

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