PHONE NUMBER

+44 7853 844688

EMAIL ADDRESS​

info@kqsolicitors.com

The Impact of Brexit on UK Refugee Travel Documents: What You Need to Know

The Impact of Brexit on UK Refugee Travel Documents: What You Need to Know

Since the UK’s exit from the European Union (EU), UK refugee travel documents have been significantly impact. For those seeking asylum in the UK, obtaining a UK refugee travel document is now more complicated than ever.

With so many changes, it’s important to understand how Brexit affects UK refugee travel documents . And what steps must be taken to obtain them? This blog post will discuss the UK refugee travel document after Brexit and what you need to know.

What are the Changes?

The UK’s withdrawal from the European Union (EU) has had significant consequences for refugees and asylum seekers.

As a result of Brexit. It is no longer possible for refugees to travel with a UK refugee travel document issued . Before the end of the transition period on December 31, 2020. Such documents are now only valid for travel within the EU . And to some non-EU countries with special arrangements in place with the UK.

For travel to other countries, refugees must now obtain visas or other documents depending on the destination.

What Does This Mean for Refugees?

Here are some of the changes that refugees may face after Brexit:

  • Refugees in the UK will no longer be able to move freely within the EU. Free movement is a key principle of EU membership.
  • The UK will no longer be bound by the Dublin Regulation. Which allows asylum seekers to transfer from one EU member state to another.
  • Asylum seekers may be required to go through more stringent procedures and standards when applying for refugee status in the UK.
  • The closure of the Balkan Route or FRONTEX may make it more difficult for refugees to travel to the UK by sea.

Ultimately, Brexit will mean greater restrictions on the rights and freedoms available to refugees in the UK. For those seeking refugee status in the UK. It will be important to stay informed of any changes . That may affect their ability to seek safety and security in the country.

How Can I Prepare?

The UK government has implemented new regulations for those applying for a UK refugee travel document after Brexit. It is important to be aware of these changes and the implications for asylum seekers in the UK. Here are a few tips on how to prepare for the transition:

  • Check the Home Office website for the latest updates on UK immigration rules and regulations.
  • Contact your local Home Office branch for more information about the application process for a UK refugee travel document after Brexit.
  • Ensure all the relevant documentation is prepared, including copies of your passport, birth certificate, and other necessary documents.
  • Research the most up-to-date information on visa requirements, entry/exit requirements, and other changes to the UK immigration system since Brexit.
  • Consider contacting an immigration lawyer at KQ Solicitors . If you need assistance with your application or have questions about the new regulations.
  • Consider other potential routes into the UK, such as applying for humanitarian protection or family reunions.

What Other Options Do I Have?

For those who have been granted asylum in the UK. The UK refugee travel document (RTD) is the only option for traveling abroad. However, there are other alternatives to consider after Brexit.

If you were grant asylum in the UK before 2021, you might be eligible to apply for a UK passport. To do so, you must meet certain requirements, such as being a British citizen or having Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) status in the UK. Additionally, you must provide documentary evidence of your legal status in the UK and have no criminal record.

EU Citizens’ Rights

If you were grant asylum in the UK before 2021, you may be able to retain the rights of an EU citizen, including freedom of movement throughout EU countries. To be eligible for this status, you must demonstrate that you had a lawful residence in the UK for at least five years before December 31, 2020.

If you wish to travel outside the EU, options are still available. Many non-EU countries allow people with refugee travel documents to easily enter their borders. Examples include Canada, New Zealand, and Australia.

However, some countries may require additional paperwork, such as a visa and proof of financial support. Additionally, you must not have committed any serious criminal offenses in the past.

After Brexit, the UK refugee travel document will remain the main form of identification for refugees in the UK. However, if eligible, you may also be able to apply for a UK passport or retain the rights of an EU citizen. Additionally, many non-EU countries accept refugee travel documents.

It is important to research your options and ensure that you have all the necessary documentation before traveling.

Grants and Refusal Stats that Impacted Refugee Status

Note: “Other” category primarily includes long residence or discretionary leave. The skill workers’ category was formerly known as Tier 2.

EU Asylum Policy and the UK

The UK’s position on asylum has always been a point of contention, and with the Brexit vote, this issue has become even more pressing. As an EU member, the UK has been subject to the Common European Asylum System (CEAS), which sets standards and procedures for assessing and granting protection to those seeking refuge in Europe.

EU Immigration to the UK

Table 1: Net Immigration by EU and Non-EU Immigrants

This table shows the net immigration figures for EU and non-EU immigrants from 2004-2015. It shows that when the East European A8 countries joined the EU in 2004, immigration rose significantly, but it fell back during the recession after 2007.

In 2015, net EU immigration was 172,000, comprising 257,000 EU nationals arriving and 85,000 leaving. This is just below the figure of 191,000 net immigrants for non-EU nationals.

Table 2: EU Immigrants Living in the UK

Table 3: EU Nationalities Living in the UK

This table also shows that EU countries now account for 35% of all immigrants living in the UK. Now that the UK has voted to leave the European Union, it is uncertain what the UK’s approach to asylum will be.

The following are some of the main points to consider when it comes to EU asylum policy and the UK:

  • The UK is no longer bound by CEAS and the Dublin Regulation, which governs which EU member states are responsible for processing asylum claims.
  • The UK government has indicated that it will end free movement for EU citizens and has stated that it will seek to limit the number of people entering the UK. This could have a significant impact on asylum seekers and refugees.
  • The UK will also have to decide whether it will opt in or out of the ECHR, which sets out human rights standards for all European countries.
  • The UK will also need to decide whether to adhere to any of the other instruments of the CEAS, such as the Qualification Directive, which sets out the criteria for recognizing refugee status.
  • The UK will also need to decide how it will handle family reunification and relocation of refugees, both within Europe and from outside of Europe.
  • Finally, the UK must decide what rights asylum seekers will have to work and access public services.

Ultimately, until Brexit negotiations are complete, the exact impact on UK refugee travel documents after Brexit is unclear.

The Closure of the Balkan Route or FRONTEX

The closure of the Balkan Route, also known as FRONTEX, has directly impacted UK refugee travel documents after Brexit. This route was traditionally used by refugees to travel to Europe, but it was closed in 2016 due to security concerns and the large number of refugees entering Europe.

This meant fewer safe and legal pathways for refugees and asylum seekers to access Europe, creating a bottleneck in their movement. As a result, those seeking refuge now must find alternative routes, such as those found through the Mediterranean Sea or Eastern Europe, which are both fraught with danger and risk.

Furthermore, the closure of the Balkan Route means that refugees wishing to access the UK must do so through other means, such as applying for a UK refugee travel document after Brexit. This document proves that a person is recognized as a refugee and allows them to travel to the UK safely and legally.

However, obtaining this document is complex and often difficult due to the current immigration policies in the UK. For example, applicants must first apply for refugee status in an EU member state before applying for a UK refugee travel document after Brexit.

Repercussions of Leaving Dublin

The UK’s departure from the European Union will significantly impact the rights of refugees and asylum seekers. The UK is currently a signatory to the Dublin Regulation, which allows refugees to claim asylum in the first EU country they enter. This means refugees cannot move to other EU countries to claim asylum. With the UK’s departure from the EU, this regulation will no longer be applicable.

This has major implications for refugees and asylum seekers traveling from the UK, which means they cannot rely on the Dublin Regulation to claim asylum in another EU country. Without the safety net of the Dublin Regulation, refugees and asylum seekers may struggle to find safe havens within the EU.

Furthermore, this could mean that refugees and asylum seekers are left stranded in the UK without adequate protection.

Additionally, the UK’s withdrawal from the Dublin Regulation could affect how UK refugee travel documents after Brexit are issued. The UK’s exit from the EU could mean that travel documents for refugees and asylum seekers are more difficult to obtain, making it harder for them to travel between EU countries.

It is also possible that the UK government may tighten its borders to limit immigration, which could make it more difficult for refugees and asylum seekers to obtain the necessary documents they need to travel.

The repercussions of leaving the Dublin Regulation may have lasting consequences for refugees and asylum seekers. It is important to keep up with developments in the Brexit negotiations to stay informed on what this means for UK refugee travel documents after Brexit and how it could affect access to protection in the EU.

Asylum Standards and Procedures After Brexit

Brexit has created unprecedented uncertainty and complexity for UK refugees and those seeking asylum. With the UK no longer being a part of the EU, the standards and procedures for obtaining a UK refugee travel document have changed significantly.

The UK government has made it clear that those claiming asylum in the UK must demonstrate that they are unable or unwilling to return to their country of origin due to a well-founded fear of persecution. As part of this, they must provide evidence that they are not a threat to public safety or national security.

The following are some of the key changes that refugees and asylum seekers need to be aware of when applying for a UK refugee travel document after Brexit:

  • Refugees must provide detailed information on their reasons for claiming asylum, including any potential risk factors that may arise.
  • They must provide proof of identity, nationality, and documents demonstrating the conditions in their country of origin.
  • All asylum applications will now be subject to strict screening procedures to ensure public safety and security.
  • Those granted asylum status will be issued a UK refugee travel document after Brexit that is valid for five years and renewable upon expiration.
  • The application processing time has increased significantly since the UK’s exit from the EU. It can now take six months to obtain a UK refugee travel document after Brexit.
  • Asylum seekers are also subject to restrictions on their movement and travel within the UK.

Refugees and asylum seekers need to understand the new standards and procedures for obtaining a UK refugee travel document after Brexit. By staying informed about the changes and preparing for the application process, refugees can ensure that they have all the necessary documents and information to successfully apply for asylum in the UK.

FAQs – UK Refugee Travel Document After Brexit

Q: What is a UK refugee travel document?

A: A UK refugee travel document is issued to individuals who have been granted asylum or refugee status in the UK, allowing them to travel internationally.

Q: Can I travel to other EU countries with a UK refugee travel document after Brexit?

A: The ability to travel to other EU countries with a UK refugee travel document after Brexit may be limited. It is recommended that individuals check the specific travel requirements for the country they plan to visit before making travel plans.

Q: Can I travel to Turkey with a UK refugee travel document?

A: Turkey is not a member of the European Union, so travel to Turkey with a UK refugee travel document should not be affected by Brexit. However, it is recommended to check with the Turkish embassy for specific requirements and potential restrictions for individuals with a refugee travel document.

Q: What documents do I need to apply for a UK refugee travel document?

A: To apply for a UK refugee travel document, you must provide proof of your asylum or refugee status in the UK and a valid passport or other valid identification.

Q: How long does it take to process my UK refugee travel document application?

A: Processing times for UK refugee travel document applications may vary, typically within 6 to 8 weeks.

Q: Can I renew my UK refugee travel document?

A: You can renew your UK refugee travel document before it expires.

Q: Can I apply for a UK refugee travel document if my asylum status is still pending?

A: No, you can only apply for a UK refugee travel document after you have been granted asylum or refugee status in the UK.

Conclusion – UK Refugee Document After Brexit

The Brexit referendum has had a major impact on UK refugee travel documents after Brexit. As the UK leaves the European Union, new regulations and policies will be enacted.

These changes can make it harder for refugees to travel within the EU. Refugees must prepare themselves for these changes and understand their options. We hope this blog post has been informative and given you an understanding of what to expect in the coming months. If you found this information useful, please share it with others who may need it.

Thank you for taking the time to learn about UK refugee travel documents after Brexit. If you find this information helpful, don’t forget to share it with your social circle.

Why You Should Consider Business Immigration
Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa: Everything You Need to Know
Everything You Need to Know About Refugee Travel Documents in the UK
7 Tips to Preparing for a CAFCASS Section 7 Interview

Share This Post:

9 thoughts on “The Impact of Brexit on UK Refugee Travel Documents: What You Need to Know”

  1. Immigration and Citizenship. Authorities of Canada.
    From inside UK, you can pay a government price of £1,033 plus an immigration well being surcharge
    of £1,000. Kevin Cho Tipton, a vital care nurse practitioner who works at two public hospitals in South Florida, said the irony of hospitals’ muted opposition to the state’s immigration law
    is that the governor ratified another legislation this year that protects health care workers’ free
    speech. In lots of states this entitles newly arrived immigrants to public providers (housing and social companies, for example).
    You can’t claim public funds/ advantages and pensions.
    Which means the company benefits not solely from low company tax,
    but in addition from lesser compliance and other
    regulatory costs. Incorporating an offshore entity holds many benefits for
    an organization; simpler enterprise administration being
    one in all the important thing advantages.
    Furthermore, incorporating a company in Singapore only takes at some point.
    Choosing the proper jurisdiction for incorporating a business should therefore
    be done protecting these issues in mind.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Our Head Solicitor
Khurram Amir Qureshi

Khurram Amir Qureshi has been an advocate of Pakistan since 2004, a Solicitor of England and Wales since 2009, Solicitor of Ireland since 2015. He has extensive experience in family law, Immigration law, Personal injury cases, and Civil and Commercial litigation gaining over 13 years of continuous practice in England and Wales.

Recent posts
Follow us on
Get Expert Advice From Our Legal Team